The Economist Thinking Space By AMV BBDO (yeah that means me!)

10 Jul

I’ve barely had a chance to breathe since putting our new website live  The Economist: Thinking Space, and yet it’s already gaining a lot of attention.

In Europe, The Economist targets people who we call the ‘Intellectually Curious’. They are young, university educated, interested in global events and issues. They want to understand, not just what is happening, but why. However in Europe, The Economist suffers from low brand awareness. And when they are aware of it, they tend to think it is narrowly focused on finance and economics.

The Economist Thinking Space asks people…where do you get your ideas? We invite you into the lives of some of our European Economist readers – it opens the door to their ‘thinking space’. Our diverse range of influential personalities share their thoughts, ideas, parts of their lives and the role The Economist plays in it. Users are also able to upload and tag images of their own spaces, to allow the site to become more inclusive and to grow, breaking away from the brand’s historical exclusivity.

What’s more, the interactive site is built in Papervision with stunning photography and is B-E-A-UTIFUL! Built by the good guys at Hi-ReS!. Explore it now, you won’t regret it…

thinkingspace

economist_thinkingspace

In just a matter of days it’s already gaining a lot of attention and buzz on Twitter and blogs. It received 16,000 unique visits in the first two days from launch, so I’m very excited to watch it grow. We’re also working with the lovely people at We are Social to outreach to bloggers across Europe.

I hope you’ll agree that The Economist Thinking Space positions the brand as a stimulating interesting read. As always, thoughts and feedback are welcome (if not encouraged) here…

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6 Responses to “The Economist Thinking Space By AMV BBDO (yeah that means me!)”

  1. Futuristika! July 10, 2009 at 10:03 am #

    Thanks for the trackback 🙂 We have also promoted the campaign via our Twitter, Friendfeed and Facebook accounts… I guess we are the first from Istanbul, Turkey 😉

    It’s a superb idea and design, congrats and thanks again!

  2. soma uk March 2, 2010 at 9:11 am #

    hi, spring is cooming! good post there, tnx for nicspic2608.wordpress.com

  3. Larkin May 19, 2010 at 10:52 pm #

    Where did you grow up?

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. The economist, Think Space | jerome.amoudruz.info - July 12, 2009

    […] Source : https://nicspic2608.wordpress.com/2009/07/10/the-economist-thinking-space-by-amv-bbdo-yeah-that-means… […]

  2. bint battuta in bahrain: quod vide - July 14, 2009

    […] quod vide labels: books, china, history, india, iraq, language, religion A friend of mine used to wander through history by following each q.v. in an enyclopaedia or historical dictionary. Each q.v. would lead to another entry, which would lead to another, and so on. Of course, these days q.v. has been largely replaced by the hyperlink. (Interestingly, while Wikipedia has a disambiguation page for QV, from which one can go to Cross-reference, that entry covers cross-referencing in hypertext.)Last night I was struggling to get to sleep, and I decided (once again) to pick up a dry and difficult book. My choice was History of the Arabs by Philip K Hitti. However, the page I randomly opened it at (towards the end of the chapter on Abbasid society) was not dry at all. The paragraph I read was incredibly interesting, and nearly every line contained references that made me want to learn more. So today, just to satisfy my curiosity, I decided to add all the links I wanted when reading it in the book:One of the most remarkable features of Christianity under the caliphs was its possession of enough vitality to make it an aggressive church, sending its missionaries as far as India and China. Al-Nadim reports an interesting interview which he himself held with one such missionary returned from China, whom he met in the Christian quarter of Baghdad. The famous stela at Sian Fu, China, erected in 781 to commemorate the names and labours of sixty-seven Nestorian missionaries, together with the affiliation of the Christian church in India, that of the “Christians of St Thomas” in Malabar on the south-west coast, with the patriarchate in Baghdad, bear witness to the evangelistic zeal of the East Syrian Church under the Moslems. It is also recognized that the existing characters of Mongol and Manchu are lineal descendants of the original Uighurian forms, which were certainly derives from the Syriac alphabet as used by the Nestorians….While on the subject of how one acquires information and ideas, The Economist has an interesting new site called Thinking Space that is worth a look:The Economist Thinking Space asks people…where do you get your ideas? We invite you into the lives of some of our European Economist readers – it opens the door to their ‘thinking space’. Our diverse range of influential personalities share their thoughts, ideas, parts of their lives and the role The Economist plays in it. Users are also able to upload and tag images of their own spaces, to allow the site to become more inclusive and to grow, breaking away from the brand’s historical exclusivity. […]

  3. The Economist Thinking Space « Papervision3D - August 5, 2009

    […] More info here. […]

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